Grandpa’s Favorite Bread & Butter Pickles

My grandpa eats at least a jar of these bread and butter pickles a month. If gramawama runs out, I’ll be sure to hear about it and have to search my stores for another jar. These bread and butter pickles are packed with flavor; a perfect combination of sweet, salty, and briny. The hardest part is slicing all the cucumbers and onions, but the work is well worth it!

Ingredients
4 quarts sliced cucumbers (I use a mandoline)
3 large white onions, sliced thinly
6 cloves of garlic, halved
1/3 cup pickling salt
5 cups of sugar
3 cups cider vinegar
1 ½ tbs turmeric
1 ½ heaping tbs celery seed
2 tbs mustard seed

Yields 8-9 pints

Directions
1. Combine the cucumbers, onion, and garlic cloves. Toss in the salt, then cover with half a bag of ice. Mix the ingredients thoroughly and let them rest in the ice bath for about 2 – 3 hours. Drain the mixture and pick out any big chunks of ice. It’s okay if there are small pieces here and there.
2. Sterilize pint jars in boiling water or in the dishwasher. Set the lids in boiling water and set aside.
3. Whisk the sugar, cider vinegar, and spices in a large pot. Add the cucumber mixture and stir. Bring the entire mixture to a boil then remove from heat.
4. Fill the hot jars with the cucumber mixture about ½ inch from the top. Wipe the rims and place the lids on. Screw rings on tightly.
5. Process jars for 5 minutes. Set on a towel in a draft-free area and leave untouched for 24 hours. Check seals. Refrigerate any unsealed jars.

Note: You can make delicious bread and butter onions (great on sandwiches, burgers, and pulled bbq sandwiches) by using only thinly sliced onions. You will need about 5 large white onions. Omit the cucumbers but use the same recipe and follow the directions the same.

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2 Responses to Grandpa’s Favorite Bread & Butter Pickles

  1. trkingmomoe says:

    Thanks for the recipe. I booked marked this. I want to try the onions later in the fall.

  2. Pingback: Summer Canning; get started! | egg yolk days

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